Renoir: Revered and Reviled (ARTiculate: Films)

This year is the centenary of the death of French Impressionist master Auguste Renoir. His depiction of the charming and romantic 19th century French middle-class life in such paintings as “Dance at Le moulin de la Galette” and “Luncheon of the Boating Party” still fascinate viewers to this day, while the “Dance series” from 1883 remains his most popular works.

Matisse from Tate Modern and MoMA (ARTiculate: Films)

Inspired by impressionistic painters the likes of Van Gogh, Cézanne and Gauguin, French artist Henri Matisse used vivid colors and visceral imagery to express strong emotions, making him a pioneer of the art movement known as Fauvism…

Marcel Duchamp: Art of the Possible (ARTiculate: Films)

As Marcel Duchamp can attest with his painting of the “Mona Lisa” with a moustache, art does not necessarily need to be highbrow in order to achieve immortality. His subversive attitude to art redefined its meaning that had been well-established for several hundred years.

In Search of Beethoven (In Search of the Great Composers: Films)

2020 marks the 250th anniversary of Ludwig van Beethoven’s birth, and we’re celebrating the momentous occasion with a special screening of this absorbing documentary, “In Search of Beethoven”. Known as the patron saint of music, Beethoven has given the world iconic pieces such as “The Eroica Symphony”, “Ode to Joy” and “The Pastoral Symphony”.

Matthew Bourne’s Cinderella

Matthew Bourne’s contemporary dance retelling of Cinderella has been performed for over 20 years, and each rerun has been highly popular, with tickets being sold out well in advance. Bourne sets the classic children’s tale in London during the Second World War, and instead of Cinderella meeting her prince, she encounters an RAF pilot and they fall passionately in love.

More Movies and Events

Van Gogh: Of Wheat Fields and Clouded Skies (ARTiculate: Films)

Vincent van Gogh had had a lifelong yearning for love, but yet his life and death were filled with loneliness. Throughout his life, he suffered from constant anxiety and discomfort as well as a relentless struggle with poverty and romantic failures, culminating in a rage-filled episode in which he cut off his own ear, followed by suicide via a self-inflicted gunshot to the chest. He found solace only in art, and through painting he soothed his pain. Van Gogh immersed himself in rural life and nature, and consoled himself with the heavens and the earth, creating distinctive visions of night skies and wheat fields. He once wrote that “If you truly love nature, you will find beauty everywhere.”

Vermeer and Music (ARTiculate: Film)

In the film Girl with a Pearl Earring, inspired by Vermeer’s famous painting, Scarlett Johansson perfectly captures the spirit of the title character with her dreamy expression, captivating eyes and luscious lips. Along with Rembrandt and van Gogh, Vermeer is seen as one of the three greatest Dutch masters. Meticulously rendering the play of light and shadows with soft and delicate tones, Vermeer’s masterpieces, such as The Milkmaid, Woman Reading a Letter and The Art of Painting are almost always set within confined domestic spaces, combining carefully arranged objects and human figures in superb compositions.

Frida: Viva la Vida (ARTiculate: Films)

The Tate Gallery in London named Mexican artist Frida Kahlo one of the most influential artists of the 20th century. Her oeuvre consists mostly of self-portraits that combine elements of traditional Mexican culture and magical realism, which are widely collected by major museums, causing “Fridamania” the world over. Andre Breton, the founder of the Surrealist movement, likened her works to a ribbon around a bomb, while Picasso thought that no one can paint a better self-portrait than Kahlo, and Duchamp helped her organize an art exhibition in Paris. More recently, fashion houses such as Jean Paul Gaultier, Givenchy and Dolce & Gabbana introduced collections inspired by her art, and there is even a Frida Kahlo-style Barbie doll!

The Hermitage: Power of Art (ARTiculate: Films)

The State Hermitage Museum at St. Petersburg in Russia is the second largest art museum in the world, second only to the Louvre in Paris. This group of 18th century Baroque-style buildings once served as the Winter Palace to the Czars and is now the home to over 3 million pieces of art from various periods including prehistoric, ancient Egyptian, classical Roman and the Renaissance, in addition to Russian and Chinese art. The collection encompasses works by such masters as Da Vinci, Raphael, Michelangelo, Picasso, Reubens, Rembrandt, Van Gogh, Monet, Matisse and Gauguin. On display are numerous paintings, sculptures, artifacts, pottery, porcelain, gold and silverware, jewelry, coins, as well as furniture and decorative pieces.    

The Impressionists and the Man Who Made Them (ARTiculate: Films)

When impressionist painters were still being shunned and mocked by the art establishment – with one art critic even labeling them as “lunatics” – French art dealer Paul Durand-Ruel recognized their brilliance and became determined to show them off. As the man who kept painters like Monet, Degas, Manet, Renoir, Pissarro and Sisley afloat by buying up nearly 12,000 of their works and putting them on exhibitions, Durand-Ruel brought Impressionism to the world and has even been credited with creating the modern art market.

More Movies and Events

Van Gogh: Of Wheat Fields and Clouded Skies (ARTiculate: Films)

Vincent van Gogh had had a lifelong yearning for love, but yet his life and death were filled with loneliness. Throughout his life, he suffered from constant anxiety and discomfort as well as a relentless struggle with poverty and romantic failures, culminating in a rage-filled episode in which he cut off his own ear, followed by suicide via a self-inflicted gunshot to the chest. He found solace only in art, and through painting he soothed his pain. Van Gogh immersed himself in rural life and nature, and consoled himself with the heavens and the earth, creating distinctive visions of night skies and wheat fields. He once wrote that “If you truly love nature, you will find beauty everywhere.”

Vermeer and Music (ARTiculate: Film)

In the film Girl with a Pearl Earring, inspired by Vermeer’s famous painting, Scarlett Johansson perfectly captures the spirit of the title character with her dreamy expression, captivating eyes and luscious lips. Along with Rembrandt and van Gogh, Vermeer is seen as one of the three greatest Dutch masters. Meticulously rendering the play of light and shadows with soft and delicate tones, Vermeer’s masterpieces, such as The Milkmaid, Woman Reading a Letter and The Art of Painting are almost always set within confined domestic spaces, combining carefully arranged objects and human figures in superb compositions.

Frida: Viva la Vida (ARTiculate: Films)

The Tate Gallery in London named Mexican artist Frida Kahlo one of the most influential artists of the 20th century. Her oeuvre consists mostly of self-portraits that combine elements of traditional Mexican culture and magical realism, which are widely collected by major museums, causing “Fridamania” the world over. Andre Breton, the founder of the Surrealist movement, likened her works to a ribbon around a bomb, while Picasso thought that no one can paint a better self-portrait than Kahlo, and Duchamp helped her organize an art exhibition in Paris. More recently, fashion houses such as Jean Paul Gaultier, Givenchy and Dolce & Gabbana introduced collections inspired by her art, and there is even a Frida Kahlo-style Barbie doll!

The Hermitage: Power of Art (ARTiculate: Films)

The State Hermitage Museum at St. Petersburg in Russia is the second largest art museum in the world, second only to the Louvre in Paris. This group of 18th century Baroque-style buildings once served as the Winter Palace to the Czars and is now the home to over 3 million pieces of art from various periods including prehistoric, ancient Egyptian, classical Roman and the Renaissance, in addition to Russian and Chinese art. The collection encompasses works by such masters as Da Vinci, Raphael, Michelangelo, Picasso, Reubens, Rembrandt, Van Gogh, Monet, Matisse and Gauguin. On display are numerous paintings, sculptures, artifacts, pottery, porcelain, gold and silverware, jewelry, coins, as well as furniture and decorative pieces.    

The Impressionists and the Man Who Made Them (ARTiculate: Films)

When impressionist painters were still being shunned and mocked by the art establishment – with one art critic even labeling them as “lunatics” – French art dealer Paul Durand-Ruel recognized their brilliance and became determined to show them off. As the man who kept painters like Monet, Degas, Manet, Renoir, Pissarro and Sisley afloat by buying up nearly 12,000 of their works and putting them on exhibitions, Durand-Ruel brought Impressionism to the world and has even been credited with creating the modern art market.

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"Milano Design Film Festival"

Milano Design Film Festival flies from Italy to Hong Kong this coming December 6-8, co-presented by UA CineHub, K11 MUSEA and Consulate General of Italy in Hong Kong, exclusively presenting a selection of 10 film titles which envision an improved and better designed world.

Ticketing